Regional Radar NOAA Eastern US Satellite View
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Updated: @ Oct-01-2014 8:17pm  
Summary / Temperature Wind Rain * Outlook
Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy
Currently: 61.2, Max: 74.0, Min: 57.7 61.2°F
-4.2°FColder 4.2°F than last hour.

Comfortable

Feels like: 61°F

24-hr difference
-5.3°FColder 5.3°F than yesterday at this time.
  Today Yesterday
High: 74.0°F
4:38pm
76.8°F
3:16pm
Low: 57.7°F
7:04am
62.0°F
1:02am
 Calm ESE
0
Gust:
0 mph
0 Bft - Calm
Today: 10 mph 12:11pm
Rain Today: 0.00 in
Rain Rate (/hr): 0.00 in
Rain Yesterday: 0.03 in
Storm Rain: 0.00 in
This Month: 0.00 in
Season Total: 37.94 in
1 day since last rain.
Thursday

Partly Sunny
Partly
Sunny
Humidity & Barometer Almanac Moon
Humidity: 92 % Increased 9.0% since last hour.
Dew Point: 58.9°F Decreased 1.2°F since last hour.
Barometer: 30.04 inHg Rising 0.02  inHg/hr
Baro Trend: Rising Slowly
Sunrise: 7:00am
Sunset: 6:46pm
Moonset: 12:16am
Moonrise: 1:57pm
Waxing Gibbous
Waxing Gibbous, Moon at 7 days in cycle
52%
Illuminated
UV Index Forecast UV Index Forecast
Oct-01-2014
4.8     Medium 
Oct-02-2014
5.1     Medium 
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* Electronic tipping bucket totals / Daily manually recorded rain amounts as reported to CoCoRaHS will be available soon
 Station Information
 NWS Weather Forecast  - Outlook: Tonight & Thursday
Tonight

Mostly Cloudy
Mostly
Cloudy

Lo 56 °F
NWS forecast: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. North wind 3 to 5 mph.
Davis VP+ forecast: Mostly clear with little temperature change.
 
Thursday

Partly Sunny
Partly
Sunny

Hi 75 °F
NWS forecast: Partly sunny, with a high near 75. Light north wind increasing to 5 to 10 mph in the morning.
 NOAA Image of the Day

NOAA's Latest High Resolution Weather Model is Released

NOAA's Latest High Resolution Weather Model is Released

A new high resolution weather model developed by NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado was made operational by the National Weather Service. The High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model generates extremely detailed 3-kilometer resolution data for a multitude of 2-D and 3-D variables, each with 15 minute intervals. This spatial and temporal resolution is a great improvement over previous operational models and will be critical for predicting rapidly evolving severe weather. This image from the September 30, 2014 18z run shows the temperature of the surface. Clearly visible is a cold front moving across the plains that is bringing severe thunderstorms to areas in South Dakota and Nebraska.

Watch one of the developers, Stan Benjamin, discuss the development of high resolution models like the HRRR here.

High Resolution Image

Courtesy of NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory